Rules of Composition in Photography

Basically, if you imagine a photo divided into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, the main subject of the image should be where a vertical line cross a horizontal one.

Many modern cameras allow you to place a grid in the viewfinder which can be used to place the object where two lines intersect. While we are talking about the Rule of Thirds, it is generally best to place the horizon on one of the thirds, rather than in the centre of the frame, dependent on whether the main points of interest are in the sky or on the ground.

Leading Lines

These lead the viewers eyes into the picture either to the main subject or on a journey through the whole of the picture. Examples of leading lines could be a path wandering through the image, a fence line, a meandering road or a stream or river.

Symmetry

To demonstrate that the rules are no more than guidelines, the next one contradicts the Rule of Thirds. If your image is symmetrical, then it could benefit from being centred either on the horizontal, or vertical centre line. This works particularly well for reflections

Rule of Space

This rule is talking about giving the subject in the photo, space to move into the frame. This particularly applies to animals and vehicles. The object should have the most space in front of it, and not be right up to the edge of frame, giving it nowhere to go.

Rule of Odds

Generally speaking, it is thought that photos with an odd number of subjects is more visually appealing and natural looking than those with an even number, where the viewers eyes may flick around the image, unsure of where to settle. I tend to use the rule of odds particularly if taking a close up of flowers or the like.

I hope that I have given you a brief insight into composition and that when you next look through your viewfinder you will at least stop and think for a few seconds at what you are looking at and how the shot may be improved. But just remember, these rules, and all the others you will come across, are simply guide lines to help you go in the right direction, they are not railway tracks that you have to stick to rigidly. Finally I will end with the words of Pablo Picasso – “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”

Studio Photoshoot

The main light has to be placed in a very specific position in comparison to the model. The angle, height, and distance of the main light are vital to getting the right look. You do not want this light in the models eyes or from a side angle. It also needs to be placed at a good height so you are not casting shadows on the models face. With this light you need to use a diffuser or a soft box to help decrease the darkness of the shadows in the picture.

A hair light is a second light that sits in a specific position. Basically, the hair light is placed behind the model for a few reasons. To use this light correctly attach a snoot to it. A snoot is an attachment to the light that helps direct the light to a specific spot on the model; in this case it is for the hair.

The camera, you need to connect your camera with the studio lights so everything flashes in the right connections. There are a couple of was to handle the camera for a photo shoot. One of the ways is to put it on a tripod and keep the camera stationary. By doing that you will help eliminate blur and you can find a sweet spot to stay at. Another way is by just holding the camera and creating different angles while the shoot is happening.

The reflector is used to bounce light onto the models features from the main light. There are a few different types of reflector; you could use a white, black, gold and silver colored reflector. You would want to use a white reflector when the area you are taking a picture in does not have enough light. A black reflector would be used to take away light when there is too much shine washing out the model. A gold/silver reflector is for the happy medium, but find what works best for you and best for the situation in general.

Makes Sports Action Photo

Intense Focus & Concentration. Being able to capture the look on athletes’ faces when they are totally in the zone can really set a photograph apart. It’s one of those qualities in a shot that you can’t necessarily plan for, but you know it when you see it. Here is what I mean. One tennis player I really enjoy watching is Roger Federer. If you ever want to see what total concentration looks like when a tennis player at the top of his game is executing his most lethal stroke, just Google “Roger Federer Backhand”. His eyes are trained on the ball like a couple of lasers as he prepares to hit the ball. I am convinced that if someone blasted an air horn right next to Federer’s ear, he wouldn’t even hear it as he nailed another backhand winner. There are plenty of examples in other sports as well. So without a doubt, if an athlete’s focus and concentration can be caught in a photo, it can make for a very special shot.

Raw Emotion. If focus and concentration can give a photograph a certain edge, raw emotion brings it to life. I have seen many iconic sports moments on television. And years, even decades later, nothing can put me back in that moment better than a photo that has captured the emotion at that instant in time. One of best examples I can think of is the shot of Brandi Chastain after she scored the winning penalty kick to beat China in the 1999 Women’s World Cup in soccer. Again, you can Google it to see what I mean. Caught up in the moment, Chastain, ripped off her jersey revealing her sports bra and dropped to her knees in celebration. The look on her face says it all, but that is only half of the story. One of the wider shots shows her teammates sprinting down the field to join her in that celebration. That was pure, unadulterated joy, and I can’t imagine there is anything that gives a sports photographer more satisfaction than capturing that for an eternity.

The Human Body Operating At Its Peak. Let’s face it, the human body is an incredible machine. And when it can be caught in a photograph working at peak performance, it really is amazing. It doesn’t really matter what sport the athlete plays, but my favorites to watch in this arena are the individual Olympic Sports. One athlete I truly enjoyed watching in the Rio Olympics was Simone Biles. She dominated the competition on her way to winning the all-around gold medal. There were times when I thought she was going to jump out of the gym. There are dozens of outstanding photos (yup, that’s right. Google “Simone Biles”) showing her twisting and twirling in a way that the human body was not meant to do. And the ease in which Biles appears to do it is equally impressive.

Info of Smart Phone Photography

What a surprise! The photography possible with this machine is far better than any camera owned previously. It takes shot after shot of incredible photos whose detail can be enlarged and studied. Like the camera before it of course it takes videos as well.

This is a far cry from the first camera that my brother gave me when I was around 8 years of age. It was quite small but the photos I took have survived and are a record of the family history from those early years. Film had to be inserted and then the photos developed through the local chemist. It meant saving my pocket-money to redeem them.

From that time to this photography has been one of my hobbies and the quantity of shots from just about everywhere travelled or experiences enjoyed are filling albums and taking up storage space around the home. That is unnecessary with the new technology. The computer stores anything needing to be kept while some photos are printed immediately either through my printer or the local shop.

The difference in convenience and cost is astronomical and the pleasure of taking photos has increased enormously thanks to the new smart phone.

Colors Theory

Primary Colors

Many of us know about the primary shades, we all have learnt about them in school. They are the colors that can’t be made by mixing two colors, they are primary colors of a color wheel. While a standard artist color wheel makes use of red, yellow and blue as primary colors many photographers think regarding RBG (red, blue and green) color spectrum.

Secondary Shades

Secondary colors are a result of the mixing of primary colors. On the photographers color wheel, these shades are orange, purple and green.

Tertiary Hues

Tertiary colors are created by combining the secondary and primary shades. For instance, when using the first yellow, blue and red hues wheel mixing the orange and red or green and blue would result in tertiary hues.

Complementary Shades

One of the most common links is between the additional hues. Complementary colors fall in the opposite from one another on the color board. These colors develop high contrast and grab the viewer attention.

Analogous Colors

Analogous hues are next to each other on the wheel. Making use of similar shades create a more harmonious shade scheme and low-contrast.

Monochromatic Hues

The monochromes are usually referred as black and white; monochromatic shades are made from hues of just one hue, for example, several different tones of blue. Monochromatic shades are low in contrast and usually create a soothing look.

Film Cameras in a Digital Age

The size of the image sensor in a digital camera is limited. These sensors are smaller than the regular 35mm film frame. This may result in a lot of issues, such as pixel noise and light sensitivity, to name a few. you can’t find many user-oriented camera that have full frame sensors. So, their sensors are not as good as those found in film cameras.

On the other hand, you can find film media in many sizes ranging from 35mm to 135mm. it’s important to keep in mind that even the smallest size of the film doesn’t match the 24x36m film. In simple words, film cameras offer higher “resolution” than digital cameras.

Dust problems

As far as film photography goes, dust and dirt is a common problem; however, digital photography is effected more by the dust and dirt. If dust gets into the camera and reaches the sensor, you won’t be able to take clear shots.

Integrity

Negatives have higher integrity than digital photos. In other words, negatives are taken as an evidence of the image authenticity. There are a lot of programs out there that allow you to modify digital images. So, the scope for falsification of digital photos is wider, which is not true for film photography.

Storage, backups, and other Costs

You don’t need a storage medium in case of a film camera. All you need is a film reel. Moreover, the film reels are not as prone to damage as digital cameras. Even if you mishandle the reel, you may end up damaging a frame or two. The rest of frames will be intact.

On the other hand, you need large memory cards and hard drives to store digital pictures. If the storage medium is damaged, you will find it extremely hard to recover the photos you shot. All of the data will be gone forever.

About Photographing Bridal Models

As if anxiety wasn’t heavy enough, the dress adds a ton

Wearing a wedding gown, first thing is that there will be many eyes on you, especially if you are on a stage or runway. Anxiety might take its upper hand and moreover, there’s a heavy dress to shoulder around. This means that smiling and being comfortable becomes a harder task than expected. Photographers thus have to understand this and be a leader in the course of activities. They should use comforting words or humor to get the model to relax and joyfully smiling as Bridal photographs ought to be.

Consequentially, Bridal photography is best when candid moments such as romantic looks, or couples are laughing with each other are shot. Achieving this is an additional level of difficulty where the photographer has to facilitate the couples to be at ease with each other to churn out the most natural and appealing photos.

There will be difficult people to deal with

Kids are one example, and many other people will also constantly be in the way as they want to communicate with each other, or in the case of kids who are just too active will pose many difficulties during the photo shoot. The photographer has to be patient and of course be aware of such challenges.

Time crunch

For a wedding or bridal shoot, bulk of the time will go to make up and dress up the model to look perfect. Also, something we can never control is the weather if shooting outdoors. As such a need to be fast and efficient is expected of the photographer. With all the other challenges working within a time limit will be the toughest part yet.

Enhance Portrait Photographs

· Focus on getting candid pictures

Candid photos are the best when it comes to portrait photography. The candid moments bring out the best of your subject. Therefore, even if you are shooting in a studio, you are required to keep your camera clicking, and when you finally start analysing the pictures, you will realise that the candid ones are the best of the lot.

· Use the light wisely

Using the light does not mean that you are required to click the photos in bright sunlight with your model directly posing towards the sunlight. It will burn your picture. It is about intelligently using the light so that it can brighten up your subject without making it appear something artificial.

You can always process and edit the images using photo editing tools. However, if the original picture becomes too much exposed to the bright light, it will become impossible for you even to edit it.

· Take your time

Don’t hurry. It is about creating a single frame that stands out from the rest. It is difficult to use the image to tell a complete story with nothing else in the frame. In the case, it is a photo shoot; consider it essential to give brief details of the kind of look you want in advance. The more prepared you will be or the more homework you were probably be doing for a reasonable amount of time, your pictures will become full of conviction.

Bottom Line

It is always beneficial to read the blogs and articles written by eminent photographers associated with portrait photography. It will let you learn about different aspects of the particular style along with the relaxed rules that you are required to follow to make sure your attempts and hard work offer you a fruitful outcome.

Accessories for DSLR

Camera Bag

Hauling your camera and its accessories around can be quite distressing if you lack the proper way to carry it. A camera bag eliminates all the hassle. Acquiring one should be based on how much equipment you have. Shoulder bags are the go-to choice for most as they offer easy access to the camera. It is likely that you will buy filters, flashes and lenses down the road and having a safe place to keep these will matter. Besides, a bag will shelter your camera from dust and rain.

Utility Strap

Holding on to your camera for the entire length of your photography session can be quite tiresome. If you need to use your hands, you are compelled to lay down your camera, which exposes it to damage and theft. This conundrum can be solved by investing in a utility strap. It will ensure the camera is close to you at all times. It is especially recommended since it eliminates all risk of you accidentally dropping your expensive DSLR.

Tripod

Tripods are awkward to carry around, but their usefulness cannot be understated. It is a must have if you want to capture the most stead shots. You might not use it every time you are taking pictures, but it is very important that you have it with you. Aluminum tripods are good and sturdy, but also heavier to carry around. Carbon fibre ones are lighter, but also more expensive to buy.

Watermark Your Photos

1. Branding.

Your watermark can be a signature, a small photo or a logo. As such, it serves to brand you. When people look at your images, they learn something about you.

If you consistently show photos that appeal to them, they’ll get to know who you are and look forward to seeing more of what you publish.

Your images may be quotes or landscapes or funny stuff that you share.

2. Promotion.

Watermarks on your photos promote. What do you want viewers to do? Where do you want people to go? What do you want them to see beyond the image?

Answer these questions to determine what kind of watermark you should create.

You may want to promote yourself, your business, a website or blog. Make sure your watermark reflects that.

For example if your business has a logo, choose that for your watermark.

Your signature would be a good choice if you are promoting you,

I chose to create a community on Facebook, and as such, use a logo of its name, which is both personal and business.

If you use social media with its sharing capabilities, your images can potentially be viewed by thousands or million of people. That’s a lot of promotion.

3. Protection.

Certainly if your images go viral on the Internet, you want to protect your brand, so that people cannot simply take your photo and brand it as their own.

Although this latter point isn’t foolproof, because watermarks can ultimately be removed, it has some safety benefit.

In most cases, unless you are a professional photographer, you won’t need to copyright your photos.

If you’re like me, a network marketing professional, you will be using other relevant photos you find online that you want to put your own words to or your favorites quotes.